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Recent Asian longhorned beetle outbreaks in the Eastern United States have now spread into Massachusetts and have led to fast and often drastic decisions on how to stop the infestation, including selective cutting of infested trees.

USDA Finds Mauget’s Imicide Effective Against Asian Longhorned Beetle Infestation

Recent Asian longhorned beetle outbreaks in the Eastern United States have now spread into Massachusetts and have led to fast and often drastic decisions on how to stop the infestation, including selective cutting of infested trees.


This pest is under direct control and quarantine by APHIS, and such extreme measures have worked very well in Chicago, which in 2008 was declared to be free of this devastating pest, as well as protecting uninfested trees within proximity of infested, removed trees.


Asian longhorned beetle infestations have proven to be controllable with a combination of removing infested trees and applying microinjections of the pesticide imidacloprid, like that found in Imicide, a product produced by the J.J Mauget Co. Deep root soil injection treatments with the same AI have also been effective to protect uninfested host trees.


Since 2000, the USDA lists Imicide as the only trunk injection product in its Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Emergency and Domestic Program for treatment against the Asian Longhorned Beetle.


“We are proud to have partnered with the USDA since 1999 to help in the fight to eradicate the Asian longhorned beetle from US trees” said Nate Dodds, president of the J.J. Mauget Co.


According to the USDA APHIS Web site, at www.aphis.usda.gov, imdacloprid injections quickly deliver the pesticide into the trunk of the tree, taking it up throughout the stems, twigs and foliage to the active tree-growth areas where the beetle feeds and lays its eggs.


The Asian longhorned beetle is a wood-boring insect, about an inch in length, with a shiny black body with white markings. In general, adult Asian longhorned beetles remain in one specific tree for their entire life cycle, boring tunnels and exit holes throughout the tree.


The beetle is believed to have entered the U.S. in wood packing material from China, and currently infests trees throughout the Midwest and Eastern U.S.


For more information on the Asian longhorned beetle and the use of Imicide imidacloprid to control infestations, visit www.Mauget.com or call 1-800-TREES Rx (873-3779).

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